Choosing LEKI Trekking Poles

NEW 21/04/2017

Choosing the best new pair of trekking poles can be daunting when confronted with dozens of models, but by working out what type of pole user you are, combined with your size and personal preferences, it should be possible to narrow down your options to a small short-list of models.

All trekking poles, whatever their construction or appearance, perform the same functions:

  • Reduce impact loads on feet and legs
  • Using otherwise underused arms and shoulders to propel the body forward reducing the effort required from leg muscles
  • Adding extra points of contact to the ground increasing stability and traction

Making an appropriate choice of model of pole that suits the size, weight, usage and preferences of the user will enable the most effective use of the poles, as well as being more pleasant to use and presenting fewer ownership issues.

As well as the information below we also have a general Frequently Asked Questions page on all aspects of LEKI Trekking and Nordic Walking Poles: FAQ


SMALLER USERS

Up to 170cm (5ft 7in) tall, particularly female users or those with small hands.

These recommended poles are those models specifically made for smaller users. Most other poles can be used at smaller lengths and may be preferred due to a particular feature, such as grip type or budget limitations.

ACTIVITY TYPE

Day Walker:

Hill walkers on more commonly used trails or lowland walkers

RECOMMENDATIONS

Mountain Walker:

More adventurous hikers regularly visiting high mountains. Multi-day trips.


REGULAR USERS

160cm (5ft 3in) to 180cm (5ft 11in) and average build.

Some users may find the extra rigidity and toughness of poles designed for larger people may be worth the sacrifice of carrying extra weight.

ACTIVITY TYPE

Day Walker:

Hill walkers on more commonly used trails or lowland walkers.

Ultralight Walkers:

Users who demand the lightest gear.

Mountain Walker:

More adventurous hikers regularly visiting high mountains. Multi-day trips.

Tough Terrain Walkers:

Hikers in remote wilderness on rough unbroken terrain. These users may benefit from the extra rigidity and toughness of a heavier pole.


Larger and Heavier Users
178cm (5ft 10in) and above particularly of heavier build or carrying large loads.

Users wanting a smaller and lighter pole may find the limitations of shorter maximum length of poles designed for smaller people to be acceptable.

ACTIVITY TYPE

Day Walker:

Hill walkers on more commonly used trails or lowland walkers

Mountain Walker:

More adventurous hikers regularly visiting high mountains. Multi-day trips.

Ultralight Walkers:

Users who demand the lightest gear.


Types of Grips

The grip of a pole is your point of contact and so is vital for day-long comfort.

LEKI have developed a range of grips to suit most users of trekking poles and while there is no wrong type of grip for any pole use, getting the one that suits your preference will help you enjoy using your poles.

LEKI Aergon Cortec and Thermo grips

 

 

 

 

LEKI Soft Grips


ANTISHOCK

Probably THE big question when choosing a new pair of trekking poles. Do I need (or want) any form of antishock built in to my poles? The answer can only be: It is down to your personal preference.

Some walkers, after using a pole with antishock will not use a pole without it; some will not consider a pole that has it "on principal".

FOR:

  • Antishock softens the contact with the ground particularly on hard, rocky or paved surfaces.
  • Poles cannot (should not!) be placed gently on the ground, then slowly leant on as you walk forwards. This means, unless your pace is quite slow, the pole will be struck in to the ground. This can cause some people fatigue and pain in the wrists and elbows particularly on a long walk.

AGAINST:

  • Antishock mechanisms cause a slight movement after the pole tip contacts the ground. This has an effect on the feel of the tip on the ground, reducing some users confidence on loose or slippery ground.
  • Antishock adds to the weight and pack size of the pole.
  • Antishock adds a potential point of failure to the poles (Although the latest DSS antishock in the pole tip has very little to go wrong).

 

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